#youareworthy


awareness project


testimonials

"I loved the topic and I would like to be an active participant on the topic." (A. Zeadally)

"This was super cool! Love what you guys are doing, keep it up!" (Anon)

"Such a great idea!" (S. Hall)

"Love what y'all are doing!!" (C. Dream)


About

#youareworthy — a project made by two high schoolers to raise awareness about body shaming.

We opened this page in hopes to unnormalize body shaming and raise awareness about the effect it has on people and their identity. At the end of the day, our message is simple— you, in all of your entirety and with all of your flaws, are worthy.

Contact us

For any queries, suggestions or comments ↓
[email protected]

Linktree ↓
https://linktr.ee/youareworthyproject

BLOG

Hi!
Welcome to our blog, a safe space for everyone <3
Click on the photo to read our blog posts :)


alisticleonselfcare

A Listicle on Self-care!

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Interview with Model and Activist, Bishamber Das!

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Interview with Holistic Nutrition Coach, Shayna Hall!

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Interview with Psychotherapist, Dr. Ayesha Nazir!

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An introduction to who we are and what we do!

Hello, World!

18 September, 2020

Welcome to our first-ever blogpost! You might have clicked on this by accident, through our Instagram or simply out of sheer curiosity. Whatever it is, welcome!

#youareworthy is a project started off by two high schoolers living and studying in Pakistan in hopes to raise awareness about and denormalize body shaming. Of course, there is only so much the two of us can do alone, so we opened our social media in hopes of reaching a larger number of people and a wider audience.

What do we do?

Honestly? Not much! There isn’t really much we can do apart from posting constantly, scheduling interviews with influencers in hopes to spread their message and trying to reach people with our own. We promote body positivity- the idea that no matter what you look like, no matter what size you come in, you are worthy. That, of course, is where the name of our project came to be about.

What do we believe?

Body positivity is something that is, quite frankly, often taken out of context in our opinion. There’s this idea nowadays that in order to be respected, you have to be at least a bit decent-looking. You can spend the rest of your lifetime bending backwards over yourselves to please everyone and there will still always be people who will criticize you. Our belief is that no matter what others think of you, the only person who can define your worth is yourself.

Body shaming, on the other hand, is something that should be stopped. It is practically part of our tradition now, a coming-of-age practice. In hopes to combat and curb it, we have opened various pages and we hope you will join us on our journey!

If you want to keep up with what we are doing and talking about nowadays, follow us on our Instagram and Twitter and make sure to do our survey :)

And don’t forget, you are always worthy!

Interview with Psychotherapist, Dr. Ayesha Nazir

24 September, 2020

Based in Islamabad, Pakistan, Dr. Ayesha Irfan Nazir sits in front of me with a line of certifications that make zero sense to me but are impressive to say out loud-- MBBS-RMP, Mental Health Counselor CPCAB-UK, Certified NLP Practitioner ABNLP-USA, Certified Time Line Therapist TLTA-USA, Certified Life Coach ABNLP-USA. I help myself to her hand sanitizer and sit across her with my makeshift clipboard, smiling awkwardly.

Her rectangular glasses are brown. Why does everyone in medicine wear rectangular glasses? As we exchange introductions and she hands me her card, I joke awkwardly that it looks like she’s on the other side of the clipboard and pen for the first time.

“I don’t take notes during sessions,” she tells me. “It’s not how I work.”
Properly chastised, I clear my throat and return to my clipboard, starting with the first question.

What do you define “body shaming” as?

“Body shaming is a practice. It’s a practice [carried out] by other people when they mock someone- when they shame someone for their colour, their shape, their size… It’s more to do with your own self-worth-- when you don’t have your own self-worth, you’re going to project that onto others. A cowardly person will be the one to scare another person. When you’re not okay with your own body, you’re going to shame others’-- one-up behaviour.”

In your expert opinion, how does body shaming impact an individual and their identity?

“It’s [body shaming] part of growing up. When kids are growing up, they first idolize their parents, then they go on to peers, their friends, teachers, celebrities… That’s how they form their identity. When they go to school and they see their peers, their friends being body shamed, it affects them psychologically. An identity crisis sets in- self-worth, self-doubt, low self-esteem-- they set in and they stay there. That’s when it starts.”

How would you recommend one to handle being body shamed?

“This starts at home. The first job is with the parents- we call it “mirroring” and “idealizing”, that we have to give to our children a healthy sense of self so that when they’re growing up, they have a very strong internal validation system so that they don’t go towards others to validate them for their own bodies, their own health, their own capabilities, capacities, qualities. They don’t look towards others for anything, they look inside. That comes from a healthy sense of self that begins at home.

“But if somebody does not have a healthy sense of self and they’re being body shamed, if they can’t handle it, they should go to therapy. The therapist works on re-parenting-- giving them a nurturing relationship so their internal, healthy self is formed and they can get rid of interjections in a healthy way.”

How do you think the media has influenced body shaming?

“It has a big influence. We have created an artificial world of perfection. People are running after perfection so they lose themselves-- nothing is perfect in this world! It’s all subjective. When only one thing is being portrayed… Beauty is in variety. As there are different languages, people are of different colours, different heights, different weights, and that’s beauty. If everything was uniform, how would that be beautiful? How would you appreciate it? What will be beauty? You have to see beauty in everything.

“The media portrays beauty as size zero, colour white, tall, thin which is an unhealthy message. These days, with filters and fillers and plumpers and this and that, what do you expect? The media has a huge part in body shaming.”

Do you think body shaming is connected in any way to other mental illnesses?

“It can lead to other mental illnesses. Body shaming can lead to neurosis and then neurosis can cause many other psychological mental health issues in a person like anxiety, depression, suicide ideation. People can go through mood disorders because they can’t handle it anymore. We don’t normalize that every person on this planet has their own unique beauty. We make one standard and we make everyone else follow that standard and shame them when they don’t follow it. You cause them to go through difficult and serious inner conflict throughout which gives ways to a multitude of mental health issues in a person.”

What are some ways we can all come together to counter body shaming?

“We should accept who we are. We should give out the message to our children that ‘I’m okay the way I am… I’m neither fat, I’m neither thin, I’m neither dark, I’m neither light, I’m neither tall, I’m neither short-- I am okay the way I am. Every individual, every living being is unique in their own sense. That uniqueness is what makes you you.’

“We should stop promoting ads of fairness creams. We should stop promoting certain images of certain body types, certain colours, certain weights, heights… We should stop this collectively as a society, as a nation, and then at an international level.”

And finally, what do you think constitutes being defined as "worthy”?

“Every being has been born unique. This- this is all subjective, this is all perception. Perception is projection-- if you agree with it, that’s what you’ll project onto the world. The belief will be formed from an internal validation system, which comes from a healthy sense of self. If you have a healthy sense of self, you’ll believe in your own self-worth, you’ll find something to be proud of in yourself, and that is what you will project onto the world. ‘I believe I am good at this. I am proud of this quality, I am proud of myself.’ This is what you’ll project onto the world and this is what they’ll see. So it comes from internal validation and a healthy sense of self-- only you can define yourself as worthy. The world will just have to follow your lead.”


Thank you for your time, Doctor!
You can contact her at her email address or at her phone number,
+92 321 8872597

And don’t forget, you are always worthy!

Interview with Mindfully Mae!

29 September, 2020

In the few emails we exchanged with her, the person behind @mindfullymae on Instagram and Twitter seems just that- mindful. An up-and-coming influencer who boasts a steady following of over 6,000, Shayna Mae’s Instagram feed is adorned with beige and brown-toned photos of her stretching her body in various yoga positions that tickle your aesthetic side, gorgeous photos of her food, long, moving captions, and general positivity. As soon as you click on her website, you are greeted with soft promises in purple tones and a banner inviting you to book a free discovery call with the woman herself to discuss what you need to move forward.

A bubbly, thoughtful young woman in an otherwise harsh world, Mae stands out from the influencer scene with her relatability, honesty, and compassion when discussing the brutal truth behind diets and what your body needs to flourish such as on a June 23 blogpost to her website minfullymae.com where she states in a post about her experience with the Whole30 diet that “My biggest fear going into this challenge was the thought of weight loss - I recognized that I didn’t have a lot of room to lose weight. The fact that this was my fear shows that I knew I would have trouble fuelling myself with what foods I was ‘allowed’ to have and goes against all food-directed beliefs I hold today.”

Advertising herself as an Anti-Diet and Food Freedom coach, we here at #youareworthy felt that her perspective on the questions that are often raised would not only be welcomed but was needed as a young influencer on the weapon we call social media.

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Pictured: Shayna Mae
click on the photo to be taken to her website

What do you think “body shaming” is?

To me, body shaming is being critical of another individual for the way in which their body looks. It’s making assumptions about a person based upon the look of their body. This occurs for both larger and smaller bodied individuals.

Do you think body shaming has increased or decreased in recent years? Why?

Body shaming has been around for decades. I don’t know that it has increased or decreased, however I do believe there is a growing spotlight on the topic which may make it appear as if it has increased. Increased attention perhaps, but not increased occurrence. That being said, this spotlight has made it clear that the occurrence of body shaming is significantly large, and can be found an alarming amount within a single day on social media.

I do believe that with the growth of social media there has been an increase in direct and outward body shaming. Although the individuals holding these negative beliefs may be within a similar number, the ability to outwardly express these beliefs to the world has increased. Social media has made it easy for those that troll the internet to spread negativity, such as the act of body shaming, at an increased speed to an increased number of people.

However, there is also an increase in social media pages that are actively combating these negative and restrictive thoughts, educating many of the importance of love for all sizes, and what true health really is. This has created a supportive environment, helping many people love themselves a little harder.

How do you think we can combat body shaming?

I believe everyone has a part to play in combating body shaming. All humans should use language that is inclusive to all sizes, and stop giving compliments based upon the look of an individual’s body and instead focus on other characteristics. I believe we should speak more about true health being a combination of physical and mental health – developing an understanding that this looks different for everyone. Acknowledge and spread the message that there is not one particular size that is beautiful. As humans, we need to remember that we have not lived the experiences of any other individual and therefore we have no right to speak on their body.

You’re a social media influencer. How do you think social media has influenced body shaming in general?

As with many things, I believe social media has been both a blessing and a curse for body shaming. A blessing because it has created a platform to educate others on the importance of accepting and loving all body types. It has created an outlet for those who have experienced body shaming to share their story and connect with other individuals with similar experiences. This has created a distanced support group and help for those still learning to accept their own bodies.

It has been a curse because everyone has the ability to subject themselves to a limited group of individuals within social media. This can create desires and beliefs surrounding a particular body type. Social media has also provided an outlet for individuals who wish to share their negative assumptions and comments regarding other humans’ bodies which can be beyond hurtful to many.

I do believe that this is moving in the right direction as there continues to be an increase in body-love accounts and an increase in companies hiring models of a variety of sizes to promote their products. This still needs work but I am happy to see many companies moving in the right direction.

How do you personally deal with the negative comments thrown your way?

I try to remember that negative comments from others often come from a place of insecurity or lack of education on the topic. My effort is to not get angry but to try to educate on why such comments are hurtful, unnecessary or just flat-out wrong. I make an effort each day to engage in activities of self-love and to constantly give myself compliments. I work to love myself so I don’t need to be 100% loved by others. I’ve developed an understanding that how I view myself is the most important and if I can view myself in the most positive light, the negative comments of others won’t sink as deep.

What are your thoughts on diet culture?

I believe diet culture is a trap created for companies to make as much money as they can off the insecurities of others. Diet culture then works to further reinforce these insecurities to thus make more money. It is a system designed to steal individuals’ money, time, energy and trust in themselves. It’s an extremely exclusive culture that thrives off making others feel bad and guilty for the body that they are in. It is extremely invasive as it affects many individual’s mental health and overall day-to-day life.

It breaks down an individual's ability to trust their own mind and body. Diet culture tells us what to eat, when to eat and exactly how to eat it. People begin to think that they can’t be trusted around food without these rules and restrictions which, over time, leads to extremely unhealthy eating behaviors and a negative relationship with food. Most often there is an on-and-off dieting cycle that takes place which negatively affects the mind and the body in a number of ways.

Do you think where you live has had any role in the way both you and others look at your body?

I don’t believe that Canada specifically, or Nova Scotia, has been a core influence in the views of my body. I do however believe the western world as an entirety, has largely influenced the way in which I, and others, have and continue to look at my body.

Interestingly, when I moved to South Korea I quickly realized that the Western world has also largely influenced their views of body standards and what is considered beautiful.

Did you ever question your worth because of body shaming and has it impacted your identity in any way?

Less now, but in the past absolutely. Body-shaming has forced people to believe they should fit into beauty standards to be seen as worthy, accepted and beautiful. When I was in grade school it was common for others to vocally make note of how small I was and create their own beliefs around that. As this was frequently brought up, it unconsciously became part of my identity. Thus, as I got older and my body naturally changed size, I became self-conscious and briefly considered myself to be too big for my frame.

Over time I spent a great amount of time eating an extreme clean diet and obsessing over exercise in order to maintain the small body I thought I was supposed to have. Now, finding intuitive eating and coming out the other side of trying to be as small as I could, I found a size that works for me. I still understand that I live within a privileged body as I am still, naturally, on the smaller side. Time-to-time I have thoughts creep in regarding my smaller self, due to the constant display of beauty standards, but I remind myself of my increased happiness, the gratitude I have and the fact I am much healthier now.

Do you have any advice for anyone whose appearance is often criticized?

Do everything you can to love yourself and remember the criticisms of others comes from a place lacking education, empathy and confidence in themselves. I do not believe those that are putting you down are truly happy. Forget about them - discover and cultivate your own happiness.

What do you think constitutes being defined as "worthy"?

Worthy is defined as having or showing qualities that merit recognition in a specified way. I believe everyone is worthy in their own way.

"I work to love myself so I don’t need to be 100% loved by others."

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Pictured: Shayna Mae
click on the photo to be taken to her website


Thank you for your time, Shayna!
You can contact her at her email address or her website, mindfullymae.com!

And don’t forget, you are always worthy!

none of the responses have been edited and are in the exact state we received them.

Interview with Bishamber Das!

2 October, 2020

Bishamber Das, model, actor, lawyer and founder of GirlLikeMe, is not only Britain’s first Asian Plus Size model but also, quite impressively, Britain’s youngest Asian magistrate. Nearing a whopping 140,000 followers on her Instagram, she is one of the pioneers of body-positive influencers and plus-size models. Bright as she is gorgeous, we decided we had to ask her about her views and thoughts on multiple topics and were lucky to land a (virtual) interview with her!

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139k followers
Britains First Asian Plus-Size Model
Lawyer
Actor

Pictured: Bishamber Das
click on the photo to be directed to her instagram

What do you think “body shaming” is?

An act one conflicts upon another when trying to humiliate their body.

Do you think body shaming has increased or decreased in recent years? Why?

I believe it may have decreased. With social media people are free to openly broadcast their opinions without consequences when commenting on someone's body but with that has come a number of inspirational and pioneering influencers who have challenged this perception and educated so many too hopefully leading to a decrease.

How do you think we can combat body shaming?

For me personally I understand each individual comment's from their own state of mind (level) I am not allowing my body or peace of mind to take on the negative energy of another. Why would I cause pain to myself (emotionally) based on the thoughts off another person for my own body?

You’re a social media influencer. How do you think social media has influenced body shaming in general?

its given a platform and voice to everyone, where people believe their opinions are facts. With that has come the comfort of saying anything without the fear of consequences, when in reality that same individual would think twice before making the same comments to someone face to face.

How do you personally deal with the negative comments thrown your way?

I always remind myself of a famous English saying 'you can be the ripest apple in the cart, but there will always be someone who don't like apples' I am not made for everyone's taste and that's ok. If you tell a flower you don't like it, its not going to stop blooming is it?

What are your thoughts on diet culture?

Its dangerous and toxic. It has caused so much harm to so many people. We need to stop exposing our children and young people to this thought process. There are so many other ways of promoting healthy life style.

What were some of the difficulties you faced as a POC and plus size model in the industry?

its a constant battle fighting for recognition. With the BLM movement you'd think publications and brands would become more aware of the importance of diversity, however I am seeing the opposite. Asian/south Asian women still being ignored but the masses celebrating how diverse they believe a certain article or campaign might be. As much as I love the work and activism of Jamila Jamil there is more than one south Asian in the whole of the UK making major contributions too!

Do you think where you live has had any role in the way both you and others look at your body?

I am a south Asian woman who belongs to an Indian heritage. The concept of beauty in south Asian culture is damaging and toxic. Growing up I was made to believe I was never worthy of any man's love simply because I was fat. And because I was fat no man would want to marry me. My own community/culture led me to believe that.

Did you ever question your worth because of body-shaming and has it impacted your identity in any way?

I am only human, I have my good and bad days just like anyone else. There are days when I am a queen and others when I am full of self-doubt. How I pick myself up is the most important thing. I have achieved so many milestones that so many can only dream of achieving I remind myself of these and how I achieved it all being just the way I am! The self-doubt soon disappears.

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Pictured: Bishamber Das
click on the photo to be directed to her instagram

"I am only human, I have my good and bad days just like anyone else. There are days when I am a queen and others when I am full of self-doubt. How I pick myself up is the most important thing."

What advice do you have for the young and bright individuals that look up to you?

There's beauty in being different. Always be proud of what and who you are. regardless of your culture, language, ethnicity, ability or gender.

What do you think constitutes being defined as "worthy"?

Respect for everyone. We ALL deserve respect.


Thank you for your time, Bishamber!
You can contact her at here or find her at her Instagram!

And don’t forget, you are always worthy!

none of the responses have been edited and are in the exact state we received them.

Survey Results + Analysis

Our survey was open for a little over 3 weeks! In a short period of time, we received over 100 responses from a variety of people. We wanted to share the results with everyone who did and didn't do our survey so we set out to compile the results and do some quick math for the analysis. We hope you enjoy it, and thanks to everyone who participated!

To see the full results in spreadsheet form, click here.

To see the summary in Google Forms, click here.

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On average, Asians thought that where you live only influences your thoughts about body shaming about 2.267 percent on a scale from 1 to 5 (where 1 was a yes and 5 was a no) while Caucasians thought it was about 1.95 percent, which shows that there is no significant cultural difference in opinion when it comes to this.

Regrettably, we only had enough data to make comparisons between Caucasians and Asians.

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Asians first started noticing issues about their own bodies at an average age of about 14.38 years whilst Caucasians started noticing issues at an average age of 11. The three years may not seem significant but considering the differences between a 14-year-old, who has started going through puberty, and a prepubescent preteen, the cultural gap is quite apparent in this case.

Regrettably, we only had enough data to make comparisons between Caucasians and Asians.

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Asians first started hearing about their own bodies from others at an average age of about 13.696 years whilst Caucasians started noticing issues at an average age of about 10.625. Interestingly, the results for this question are quite similar to the previous question, which perhaps arouses the thought that one starts finding issues in their bodies once they begin hearing about them from other people.

Regrettably, we only had enough data to make comparisons between Caucasians and Asians.

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A significant portion of the responses we received was negative. To read individual responses, please click here.

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For every 5 Asians that said yes, 2 Caucasians said yes.
For every 32 Asians that said no, 3 Caucasians said no.
For every 7 Asians that said maybe, 6 Caucasians said maybe.
For every 27 Asians that said that they had thought about it, 8 Caucasians said they had thought about it.

The results for this one were rather interesting. A great number of Asians that said they had never partaken in extreme dieting/exercise due to body shaming also said that they had thought about it. Caucasians seem to be less indecisive when it comes to this topic, perhaps due to the harsh body standards they are subjected to and the normalization of extreme diets and exercise in the West.

Regrettably, we only had enough data to make comparisons between Caucasians and Asians.

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Most people thought that body shaming should be talked about more widely. To read individual responses, please click here.

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The responses we received varied quite a bit. Most people said yes, a good portion said no, and almost as many said they were not sure. To read each individual response, click here.

Analytics

Data for our traffic and other analytics as of November 11ᵗʰ, 2020 are as follows:

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A Listicle on Self-care

31 October, 2020

As October wraps up, we find ourselves thinking of beginnings and endings.

This year was nothing short of a whirlwind. Nothing could have prepared us for the COVID-19 pandemic and its repercussions. Since we are all so caught up in the stress of the chaos and unknown around us, we at #youareworthy wanted to take a moment to just… chill out.

It’s easy to get caught up in everything that has happened and continued to happen. In fact, if you aren’t the least bit stressed, I’d be concerned! However, it is important to take a moment to step away from the exams, lectures, protests, politics, etc. to focus on yourself and do some self-care.

According to Oxford, self-care is defined as “the practice of taking an active role in protecting one's own well-being and happiness, in particular during periods of stress.” It’s a term often thrown around these days. You know, do a face mask, drink some herbal tea, draw a bubble bath! But treating yourself often takes time and money, a luxury not all of us are privileged enough to enjoy. Moreover, the charcoal face mask your friend did last night may just cause you to break out the next morning. What works for one person doesn’t work for everyone.

In my opinion, the most important part of self-care is right there in the name — the self. You must figure out what your body needs, what helps you calm down. Going through the motions on autopilot won’t help anyone! Taking time to learn your body and yourself is difficult but rewarding work and a life-long process.

So what’re a few things you can do? To get your ideas going, we’ve made a short itinerary from which you can pick and choose what sounds best!

Drink water. Clichéd advice but the best advice out there.Call a relative or a friend and tell them you miss them. Call, don’t meet! Remember, we’re still in a pandemic.Eat something. Walking around half-empty will do neither your digestive track nor your mind any favours.Dress up a little. Don’t go out or anything, just dress up for yourself. It’s amazing how much of a self-esteem boost one can get just by putting on some nice earrings you’ve had lying around for a while.Create. Make something for yourself. Bust out that bead set your grandmother gave you when you were eleven that you still have in the back of your closet. Put a pen to paper the old-fashioned way. Paint a sunset with your fingertips. It’s freeing.Mediate! Search up how to on Google or Youtube. Our minds are often so loud we can’t hear anything else and it’s good to clear them.Exercise. No need to do an actual gym routine (unless you want to!), just run for thirty minutes or do 200 jumping jacks. It takes your mind off of your worries and gets your blood pumping.

Seriously, anything goes as long as it’s not work or on a screen. Exhale, unclench your teeth and muscles and roll your shoulders. When this day ends, another one will begin tomorrow and you’ll have many more weeks. It’s alright to let yourself breathe.

If you want to keep up with what we are doing and talking about nowadays, follow us on our Instagram and Twitter.

And don’t forget, you are always worthy!

The Cultural Perspective

As we jump from continent to continent or even town to town, we see how the perspectives vary when it comes to body positivity, identity, and other issues. It is regrettable that body shaming can be found in every little crevice of the globe, we chewed over just how much a pin on the map can influence a whole society’s outlook on a certain topic.

We at here #youareworthy wanted to document that difference in perspective in a summarised manner to spread awareness and knowledge on body positivity, so this section of our website was born!
Happy reading, and don't forget, you are always worthy!

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Left: An infographic on bodyshaming from a survey conducted by Glamour.

Picture source: A Look At Body Shaming Around The World, Culturs Magazine (https://cultursmag.com/a-look-at-body-shaming-around-the-world/)

In the UK, surveys were carried out by the Mental Health Foundation with YouGov in March 2019 with over 4,500 adults and 1,100 teenagers ranging from age 13 to 19. The surveys showed the following results:
“One in five adults (20%) felt shame, just over one third (34%) felt down or low, and 19% felt disgusted because of their body image in the last year. Among teenagers, 37% felt upset, and 31% felt ashamed in relation to their body image.Just over one third of adults said they had ever felt anxious (34%) or depressed (35%) because of their body image.One in eight (13%) adults experienced suicidal thoughts or feelings because of concerns about their body image.Just over one in five adults (21%) said images used in advertising had caused them to worry about their body image. Just over one in five adults (22%) and 40% of teenagers said images on social media caused them to worry about their body image.”

source: https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/publications/body-image-report/exec-summary

From the research that we conducted ourselves, we discovered that:

On average, Asians thought that where you live only influences your thoughts about body shaming about 2.267 percent on a scale from 1 to 5 (where 1 was a yes and 5 was a no) while Caucasians thought it was about 1.95 percent, which shows that there is no significant cultural difference in opinion when it comes to this.
Asians first started noticing issues about their own bodies at an average age of about 14.38 years whilst Caucasians started noticing issues at an average age of 11. The three years may not seem significant but considering the differences between a 14-year-old, who has started going through puberty, and a prepubescent preteen, the cultural gap is quite apparent in this case.
Asians first started hearing about their own bodies from others at an average age of about 13.696 years whilst Caucasians started noticing issues at an average age of about 10.625. Interestingly, the results for this question are quite similar to the previous question, which perhaps arouses the thought that one starts finding issues in their bodies once they begin hearing about them from other people.
When asked if they had ever partaken in extreme dieting or exercise due to bodyshaming, for every 5 Asians that said yes, 2 Caucasians said yes.For every 32 Asians that said no, 3 Caucasians said no.
For every 7 Asians that said maybe, 6 Caucasians said maybe.
For every 27 Asians that said that they had thought about it, 8 Caucasians said they had thought about it.
The results for this one were rather interesting. A great number of Asians that said they had never partaken in extreme dieting/exercise due to body shaming also said that they had thought about it. Caucasians seem to be less indecisive when it comes to this topic, perhaps due to the harsh body standards they are subjected to and the normalization of extreme diets and exercise in the West.

Regrettably, we only had enough data to make comparisons between Caucasians and Asians.